New paper on detecting crisis events from unstructured text data published

New paper on detecting crisis events from unstructured text data published

November 14, 2023

New publication on detecting crisis events from unstructured text data published

 

Researchers of the TWT GmbH Science & Innovation in Stuttgart, the Earth Observation Center (EOC) of the the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Wessling, the Department of Aerospace and Geodesy of the Technical University of Munich in Ottobrunn and our Earth Observation Research Cluster of the University of Würzburg teamed up for a study on detecting crisis events from unstructured text dataThe paper titled “Detecting crisis events from unstructured text data using signal words as crisis determinants” was just published in the International Journal of Digital Earth by Hansi Senaratne, Martin Mühlbauer, Stephan Götzer, Torsten Riedlinger and Hannes Taubenböck. This study has been conducted as part of the Megacities project of the VW Momentum Initiative funded by the Volkswagen Foundation, and the project Open Search @DLR phase II funded by DLR.

 

Here is the abstractEarth observation data provides valuable information and support along the disaster management cycle. However, information from satellite remote sensing is often not available in the first hours a crisis occurs, due to several reasons, e.g. pre-defined acquisition times, cloud coverage, downlink capacities. To fill this time gap and add value to the incoming results from remote sensing data, ancillary datasets such as Twitter data become useful to enrich data and get insights into events by leveraging their spatio-temporal and thematic references. However, the main disadvantage of using Twitter data is the noise that is introduced into analyses by these data. Among other reasons, this is mainly caused by the use of insignificant search criteria that are used to harvest the data, that often result in irrelevant, noisy data (e.g. using insignificant keywords or incorrect geotags to filter data). This paper presents a method to identify crisis-event specific signal words, that are then used together with Part Of Speech (POS) tagging to filter the Twitter streams, and gather crisis-event specific data. These data are then used to estimate the location hotspots of the crisis events. The developed methods are applied as a proof-of-concept to determine flood events in May of 2022.

 

Here is the link to the full paper: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/17538947.2023.2278714

 

This works adds to earlier research studies using text data to derive geoinformation in the context of refugees (e.g. https://www.mdpi.com/2220-9964/12/4/175 ), for settlement type classification (e.g. https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/8519240 ) or to combine satellite data with social media data in the domain of the urban poor (e.g. https://www.mdpi.com/2220-9964/7/8/304 ).

 

you may also like:

Our research covered in various news channels

Our research covered in various news channels

Our joint research with various other disciplines got covered by various radio stations such as: Deutschlandfunk: https://www.deutschlandfunk.de/urbane-hitzeinseln-vermeiden-warum-wuerzburg-jetzt-per-lastenrad-kartiert-wird-dlf-f74d8b70-100.htmlBayern 2:...

social event – joint bouldering

social event – joint bouldering

Our Phd student Henri and one of our student assistants, Stefan, organized a joint bouldering sessions and booked the bouldering gym RockIn exclusively for us. It was great having the whole place for us to climb, chat and just enjoy a day with the colleagues and...

Presentations at the EARSeL conference in Manchester

Presentations at the EARSeL conference in Manchester

Dr. Marta Sapena and Dr. John Friesen represented the Earth Observation Center (EOC) of the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and our Earth Observation Research Cluster (EORC) this week at the EARSeL conference in Manchester (https://manchester2024.earsel.org/).  They...

Our PhD candidate Ines Standfuss teaches at AniMove

Our PhD candidate Ines Standfuss teaches at AniMove

Our PhD candidate Ines Standfuss is teaching remote sensing for animal movement analysis this year at MPI at Lake Constanze. The AniMove science school has been founded more than ten years ago together with MPI and other organisations such as Smithsonian joined in the...

television and radio coverage about urban measurements

television and radio coverage about urban measurements

Our urban research got covered by TV and radio where we had the chance to explain the relevance of urban monitoring via remote sensing methods as well as in-situ devices (in cooperation with Prof. Marco Schmidt) especially for adaptation and mitigation potential of...